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elinks/features.conf

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### Feature configuration file
#
# This file contains various compile-time configuration settings, which you can
# adjust below. You can fine-tune the ELinks binary to include really only what
# you want it to. It acts as a front-end to the configure script in the sense
# that it is possible to control any features in this file by passing arguments
# to the configure script. In fact any arguments given to the script will
# overrule the values set in this file.
#
# There are still some things which are to be adjusted only directly through the
# configure script arguments though, so check ./configure --help out as well!
#
# All dependency checking is done by the configure script so even though a
# feature is enabled here it is possible that it will be disabled at compile
# time if the dependencies are not met. Check the features.log file generated
# by the configure script to make sure.
### Notes for users
#
# All features that can be controlled using this file are already set to their
# default values. The syntax used is hopefully familiar to most people.
#
# '#' chars start a comment that runs until the end of the line.
#
# The features are controlled by setting the various CONFIG_<FEATURE> variables
# to either 'yes' or 'no' depending on whether it should be enabled or disabled.
# So in order to disable bookmark support a line in this file should say:
#
# CONFIG_BOOKMARKS=no
#
# It is also possible to simply comment out the line in order to disable it.
# Therefore, if the default doesn't suit you, you can either comment it out or
# set it to the value you desire.
### Notes for developers
#
# Please strive to keep the format of all entries uniform, it will make it
# easier for us as well as for the users. Do not forget to accurately describe
# the feature and also the impact of enabling/disabling it. Follow the format of
# existing comments. Follow the example of XBEL when adding features which also
# need some detection in configure.in.
#
# Not everything is suitable for an entry in this file, maybe it would be
# happier directly in the configure.in. If it is really purely question of
# system support (X2, HAVE_SA_STORAGE), and it makes no sense for the user to
# touch it, do not include it here.
#
# Also, use your common sense. (Not that I would trust it that much... ;-))
# --pasky
### Bookmarks
#
# ELinks has built-in hierarchic bookmarks support. Open the bookmarks manager
# by pressing 's'. When bookmarks are enabled, also support for the internal
# ELinks bookmarks format is always compiled in.
#
# This is a favourite target for disabling in various embedded applications.
# It all depends on your requirements.
#
# Also read the ``The Ultimate Bookmarks Guide'' in doc/bookmarks.txt
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_BOOKMARKS=yes
### XBEL Bookmarks
#
# ELinks also supports universal XML bookmarks format called XBEL, also
# supported by ie. Galeon, various "always-have-my-bookmarks" websites and
# number of universal bookmark converters.
#
# Frequently, you know you will not need it, then you can of course happily
# forcibly remove support for it and save few bytes.
#
# Default: enabled if libexpat is found and bookmarks are enabled
CONFIG_XBEL_BOOKMARKS=yes
### Cookies
#
# Support for HTTP cookies --- a data token which the server sends the client
# once and then the client sends it back along each request to the server. This
# mechanism is crucial for ie. keeping HTTP sessions (you "log in" to a site,
# and from then on the site recognizes you usually because of the cookie), but
# also for various banner systems, remembering values filled to various forms,
# and so on. You can further tune the ELinks behaviour at runtime (whether to
# accept/send cookies, ask for confirmation when accepting a cookie etc).
#
# This functionality is usually quite important and you should not disable it
# unless you really know what are you doing.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_COOKIES=yes
### Form History
#
# The famous Competing Browser has that annoying thing which pops up when you
# submit a form, offering to remember it and pre-fill it the next time. And yes,
# ELinks can do that too! You will still need to also enable this manually at
# document.browse.forms.show_formhist.
#
# Many people find it extremely annoying (including pasky), however some others
# consider it extremely handy and will sacrifice almost anything to get it. It
# will not do any harm to have this compiled-in as long as you will leave it
# turned off (which is also the default configuration).
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_FORMHIST=yes
### Global History
#
# This device records each and every page you visit (to a configurable limit).
# You can browse through this history in the history manager (press 'h'). Do
# not confuse this with the "session history", recording history of your
# browsing in the frame of one session (session history is the thing you move
# through when pressing 'back' and 'unback' or which you see in the
# File::History menu).
#
# Global history does not care about the order you visited the pages in, it just
# records that you visited it, when did you do that and the title of the page.
# Then, you can see when did you visit a link last time (and what was the title
# of the target document at that time), links can be coloured as visited etc.
#
# If you disable this feature, you will not lose any crucial functionality, just
# some relatively minor convenience features, which can nevertheless prove
# sometimes very practical.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_GLOBHIST=yes
### MIME
#
# ELinks uses a MIME system for determining the content type of documents and
# configuring programs for external handling. By default the option system can
# be used to configure how media types are handled. More info about how to set
# up the MIME handling using the option system can be found in the doc/mime.html
# file.
#
# Below are listed some additional ways to do it.
### Mailcap
#
# Mailcap files describe what program - on the local system - can be used to
# handle a media type. The file format is defined in RFC 1524 and more info
# including examples can be found in the doc/mailcap.html file.
#
# This is very useful especially for clean interoperability with other
# MIME-aware applications and fitting nicely into the UNIX system, where this is
# the standard way of specifying MIME handlers. If you are not interested in
# that, you can still use the internal MIME associations system, though.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_MAILCAP=yes
### Mimetypes File
#
# Mimetypes file can be used to specify the relation between media types and
# file extensions.
#
# Basically same thing applies here as for the mailcap support.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_MIMETYPES=yes
### IPv6 Protocol Support
#
# You know this thing that was designed to obsolete IPv4 but only pasky,
# weirdos and projects supported with big funds really use. ;-)
#
# Default: enabled if the system supports it
CONFIG_IPV6=yes
### URI Rewriting
#
# The goto dialog through which new URIs can be entered is an essential part of
# browsing in ELinks. This feature makes the dialog more powerful by making it
# possible to extend how entered text is handled through a set of rewrite rules
# (see protocol.rewrite options).
#
# There are two types of rules: simple and smart ones.
#
# Simple rewriting rules are basically URI abbreviations, making it possible to
# map a word to the full URI. They can also be used for hierarchic navigation to
# ease moving from some nested directory to the parent directory or doing other
# stuff with the current URI. For example, when you type 'gg' into the goto
# dialog, you will be materialized at Google's homepage.
#
# Smart rules can take arguments and therefore enable more advanced rewriting.
# The arguments could be search words to google for or a lookup query for a
# dictionary. Eg. type 'gg:Petr Baudis king of ELinks cvs'.
#
# This feature is also available in a more powerful form in the Lua and Guile
# extensions, so if you plan to or already use those, you won't miss anything by
# disabling this feature (besides easier and better integrated configuration).
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_URI_REWRITE=yes
### BitTorrent Protocol Support
#
# The BitTorrent protocol is a protocol for distributing files in a peer-to-peer
# (P2P) manner. It uses the HTTP protocol for communicating with a central
# server and a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol for exchanging file pieces betweens
# peer downloaders. The integrity of file pieces downloaded from peers are
# checked using cryptographic hashing (SHA1).
#
# Downloads using BitTorrent are started by first downloading a .torrent file
# with the MIME type "application/x-bittorrent". The file contains information
# which enables ELinks to ask a central server, called a tracker, for
# information about other downloading peers and start downloading from and
# uploading to them.
#
# At any time, an external handler can always be defined to take precedence of
# the internal BitTorrent client and the internal client can always be forced
# by prefixing the URI of the .torrent file with "bittorrent:"
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_BITTORRENT=no
### Local CGI Support
#
# ELinks can (like w3m or lynx) execute certain executable files stored on the
# local disks as CGIs, when you target it on them (through a URI of the 'file'
# scheme). ELinks emulates the complete CGI environment, like the program would
# be executed by a web server. See the protocol.file.cgi options tree for
# detailed runtime configuration.
#
# Some people just write their bookmark management application as Perl CGI
# script and then access it from the web browser using this feature, not needing
# any web server or so. Therefore, this is a great possible way to extended the
# browser capabilities.
#
# Even when you compile this in, you need to enable this yet in the
# configuration, and even then only CGI files passing certain user-defined
# filters (path-based) will be allowed to be executed (and there are certain
# other security barriers in place).
#
# Default: disabled, available if setenv() or putenv() is found
CONFIG_CGI=no
### Data URI protocol
#
# The data URI protocol is defined in RFC 2397 and allows inclusion of small
# data items as "immediate" data, as if it had been included externally.
#
# A data URL might be used for arbitrary types of data. The URI
#
# data:,A%20brief%20note
#
# encodes the text/plain string "A brief note", which might be useful in a
# footnote link.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_DATA=yes
### Finger User Information Protocol Support
#
# The finger protocol is a simple protocol defined in RFC 1288. The server
# return a friendly, human-oriented status report on either the system at the
# moment or a particular person in depth such as whether a user is currently
# logged-on, e-mail address, full name etc. As well as standard user
# information, it displays the contents of ".plan" file in the user's home
# directory. Often this file (maintained by the user) contained either useful
# information about the user's current activities, or alternatively all manner
# of humor.
#
# It is most often implemented on Unix or Unix-like systems however due to
# security and privacy reasons it is usually disabled or only allowed locally on
# the system.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_FINGER=no
### File Transfer Protocol Support
#
# The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a software standard for transferring
# computer files between machines with widely different operating systems.
#
# Many sites that run FTP servers enable so-called "anonymous ftp". Under
# this arrangement, users do not need an account on the server. By default,
# the account name for the anonymous access is 'anonymous'. This account
# does not need a password, but users are commonly asked to send their email
# addresses as their passwords for authentication (protocol.ftp.anon_passwd),
# but there is no verification.
#
# See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ftp .
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_FTP=yes
### Gopher Protocol Support
#
# Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol
# designed for the Internet in RFC 1436. The need for gopher arose in in the
# early days of the hypertext Internet where the number of documents that were
# being published in campus and research environments could not easily be
# distributed using known protocols like FTP because these documents were stored
# not in one place, but in many computers connected to the Internet.
#
# The support works much like local file browsing with directories (aka. menus)
# and various file types that can be downloaded and viewed.
#
# It is still very experimental and the CSO phone-book protocol is not
# implemented.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_GOPHER=no
### NNTP Protocol Support
#
# Network news transport protocol support makes it possible to access nntp
# and news servers and read postings. It is still very experimental and is
# far from being considered a ``news reader''.
#
# It is possible to list news groups on a server, articles in a news group
# and retrieve articles by their number or message-id.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_NNTP=no
### SMB Protocol Support
#
# ELinks supports browsing over the SMB protocol (URI 'smb' scheme), using the
# smbclient program as back-end. Therefore, in order to have this enabled, you
# will need to install Samba (or at least just the smbclient part, if you can
# install it separately).
#
# Default: enabled if smbclient will be found
CONFIG_SMB=yes
### Cascading Style Sheets
#
# Simplistic CSS support. It is still very much in it's infancy so don't expect
# too much. If you have use of background colors enabled more pages will have
# the intended background color. Also quite a few additional text attributes are
# applied. One example is highlighting of search words on Google's cached pages.
#
# There are options to disable both imported style sheets to minimize network
# traffic and whether to use CSS at all. Also a default style sheet can be
# defined to control the basic layout in the HTML renderer.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_CSS=yes
### HTML Highlighting
#
# Makes it possible to view HTML source with the markup highlighted in colors
# configurable using CSS. It also makes values of referencing attributes
# accessible like the href="<uri>" attribute in <a> elements.
#
# The HTML highlighting uses components of an experimental DOM implementation
# still in progress so enabling this feature will add a considerable amount of
# code to the compiled binary. On the other hand it will help to debug what will
# hopefully evolve into the next generation document renderer.
#
# Default: disabled, requires that CSS is enabled
CONFIG_HTML_HIGHLIGHT=no
### Mouse Support
#
# ELinks may be controlled not only by keyboard, but also by mouse to quite some
# extent. You can select links, menu items, scroll document, click at buttons
# etc, and it should hopefully work. ELinks supports mouse control by GPM, xterm
# mouse reporting and TWAIN's twterm mouse reporting.
#
# It is generally nice convenience and doesn't cost too much. However, you can
# do everything with keyboard as you can with mouse. Also note that the xterm
# mouse reporting takes control over the terminal so that copy and pasting text
# from and to ELinks has to be done by holding down the Shift key.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_MOUSE=yes
### 88 Colors in Terminals
#
# Define to add support for using 88 colors in terminals. Note that this
# requires a capable terminal emulator, such as:
#
# - Thomas Dickey's XTerm, version 111 or later (check which version you have
# with xterm -version) compiled with --enable-88-color.
#
# - Rxvt, version 2.7.9 or later compiled with --enable-88-color.
#
# You will still need to enable this at runtime for a given terminal in terminal
# options, or set your $TERM variable to xterm-88color - then, ELinks will
# automatically configure itself to make use of all the available terminal
# features, while still acting sensibly when you happen to run it in an xterm
# w/o the 88 colors support.
#
# When enabled, the memory usage is somewhat increased even when running in mono
# and 16 colors mode (the memory consumption can be especially remarkable when
# rendering very large documents and/or using very large terminals). However,
# when you actually run it in the suitable terminal, it looks really impressive,
# I'd say marvelous!
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_88_COLORS=no
### 256 Colors in Terminals
#
# Define to add support for using 256 colors in terminals. Note that this
# requires a capable terminal emulator, such as:
#
# - Thomas Dickey's XTerm, version 111 or later (check which version you have
# with xterm -version) compiled with --enable-256-color.
#
# - Rxvt, version 2.7.9 or later compiled with --enable-256-color.
#
# - Recent versions of PuTTY also have some support for 256 colors.
#
# You will still need to enable this at runtime for a given terminal in terminal
# options, or set your $TERM variable to xterm-256color - then, ELinks will
# automatically configure itself to make use of all the available terminal
# features, while still acting sensibly when you happen to run it in an xterm
# w/o the 256 colors support.
#
# When enabled, the memory usage is somewhat increased even when running in mono
# and 16 colors mode (the memory consumption can be especially remarkable when
# rendering very large documents and/or using very large terminals). However,
# when you actually run it in the suitable terminal, it looks really impressive,
# I'd say marvelous!
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_256_COLORS=no
### Ex-mode Interface
#
# The ex-mode interface makes a prompt available when pressing ':'. The prompt
# can be used for entering actions like ':goto-url' and configuration file
# commands.
#
# The code is still very experimental and lacks much work such as tab
# completion.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_EXMODE=no
### LEDs
#
# These are the tiny LED-like indicators, shown at the bottom-right of the
# screen as [-----]. They are used for indication of various states, ie.
# whether you are currently talking through a SSL-secured connection,
# what is the current input mode (normal or insert), JavaScript errors etc.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_LEDS=yes
### Document Marks
#
# Makes it possible to set marks in a document and then later jump to them kind
# of like how fragments in URIs work. It is currently only possible to jump to
# marks set in the current document.
#
# Default: enabled
CONFIG_MARKS=yes
### Debug mode
#
# Assertions are evaluated and will core dump on failure. Some extra sanity
# checks are done, and some errors will cause core dump instead of just a
# message. Internal memory leak detection is activated (memory usage will grow),
# and every allocation/reallocation/free operations will be slower due to extra
# tests. Lists sanity checks are enabled, so list operations are slower. Hot-key
# debugging is enabled, it highlights redundant hot-keys in a menu.
#
# This option should be _always_ used by beta testers and developers, it helps
# to detect many issues. Binary packages maintainers should not use this option
# in normal situation.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_DEBUG=no
### Fast mode
#
# This option provides a way to generate a faster and smaller binary of a
# _stable_ version of ELinks. Please do not use it with unstable releases
# (unless memory footprint, performance and/or binary size are major issues for
# you).
#
# It disables all assertion tests and sanity checks effectively reducing safety.
# It disables internal memory allocation routines, directly calling libc
# functions (so it's much faster, but memory allocation issues and memory leaks
# will be not detected). It defines fmem_alloc(), and fmem_free() to be in fact
# alloca() and nothing, providing much faster allocations in routines where they
# are used
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_FASTMEM=no
### Own C library functions
#
# Enable this to use the various C library stub functions that is part of the
# portability layer instead of those available in the C library on the system.
#
# It will make the binary slightly bigger and should only be used for testing
# the portability layer.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_OWN_LIBC=no
### Small binary
#
# Reduces the size of the binary but also disables a few memory consuming
# optimizations to make the program much lighter when running.
#
# Part of the size reduction is due to various help text not being compiled in
# which will affect usability. Also the disabled optimization will make ELinks
# run slower.
#
# See doc/small.txt for more information about how to reduce the size of ELinks.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_SMALL=no
### Back-trace Printing
#
# Once upon a time, a disaster happens and ELinks crashes. That is a very sad
# event and it would be very nice to have some means how to diagnose it. In the
# crash handler, ELinks prints out various helpful things, however the truly
# important information is _where_ did it crash. Usually, users do not have gdb
# installed and can't provide a back-trace. However, ELinks can print a
# back-trace on its own, if the system supports it (currently, it is implemented
# only for glibc). It is not always accurate, it is useless when the ELinks
# binary is stripped and it still misses a lot of important information, but it
# can be sometimes still an indispensable help for the developers.
#
# You should keep this, unless you will strip your ELinks binary anyway, you
# know you are not going to report back any failures and you care about each
# single wasted bit.
#
# Default: enabled if the libc supports it (only glibc)
CONFIG_BACKTRACE=yes
### Disable Root User
#
# Browsers are scary monsters used for traveling around in an even more scary
# world where people indifferently throw garbage files at you and threaten your
# perfect world. Altho' ELinks is a small monster compared to most browsers, it
# can still bite your head off and some might consider running it as the root
# user extremely dangerous. To prevent such usage simply enable this feature.
#
# Default: disabled
CONFIG_NO_ROOT_EXEC=no
# $Id: features.conf,v 1.35 2005/08/09 17:04:01 jonas Exp $
# vim: filetype=sh textwidth=80