Replace escape <,> with <, >

for i in *.html.docuwiki; do perl -pi -e "s/&gt;/>/g" $i; done
for i in *.html.docuwiki; do perl -pi -e "s/&lt;/</g" $i; done
This commit is contained in:
peteyboy 2021-03-11 23:50:37 +00:00
parent 11889ecf9e
commit c81979dcbf
63 changed files with 573 additions and 573 deletions

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@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Next we need to edit the '"db/migrate/001_create_links.rb"' file. Files located
==== Edit '"db/migrate/001_create_links.rb"' ====
class CreateLinks &lt; ActiveRecord::Migration
class CreateLinks < ActiveRecord::Migration
def self.up
create_table :links do |t|
t.column :name, :string

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@ -111,11 +111,11 @@ Start the webrick server on the port that is equal to your uid, which you can ob
$ railsctl start
- or -
$ ruby $HOME/html/rails/my_first_project/script/server -p `id -u`
=&gt; Booting WEBrick...
=&gt; Rails application started on http://0.0.0.0:60844
=&gt; Ctrl-C to shutdown server; call with --help for options
=> Booting WEBrick...
=> Rails application started on http://0.0.0.0:60844
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server; call with --help for options
Then point your browser at "http://yourdomain:&lt;YOUR UID&gt;" You should now be looking at the default 'Welcome to Rails page'. Now you can begin to develop your rails app.
Then point your browser at "http://yourdomain:<YOUR UID>" You should now be looking at the default 'Welcome to Rails page'. Now you can begin to develop your rails app.
===== Hello, world of Rails! =====
@ -134,14 +134,14 @@ In the same way that we used the rails command to create a new Rails application
The script logs the files and directories it examines, noting when it adds new Ruby scripts or directories to your application. For now, we're interested in one of these scripts and (in a minute) the new directory. The source file we'll be looking at is the controller. You'll find it in the file app/controllers/say_controller.rb. Let's have a look at it.
class SayController &lt; ApplicationController
class SayController < ApplicationController
end
Pretty minimal, eh? SayController is an empty class that inherits from ApplicationController, so it automatically gets all the default controller behavior. Let's spice it up. We need to add some code to have our controller handle the incoming request. What does this code have to do? For now, it'll do nothing. We simply need an empty action method.
Let's add an action called hello to our say controller. Adding a hello action means creating a method called hello in the class SayController. But what should it do? For now, it doesn't have to do anything. Remember that a controller's job is to set up things so that the view knows what to display. In our first application, there's nothing to set up, so an empty action will work fine. Use your favorite editor to change the file say_controller.rb in the app/controllers directory, adding the hello method as shown.
class SayController &lt; ApplicationController
class SayController < ApplicationController
def hello
end
end
@ -150,8 +150,8 @@ Now let's try calling it. Navigate to the URL "http://yourdomain:60844/say/hello
It might be annoying, but the error is perfectly reasonable (apart from the weird path). We created the controller class and the action method, but we haven't told Rails what to display. And that's where the views come in. Remember when we ran the script to create the new controller? The command added three files and a new directory to our application. That directory contains the template files for the controller's views. In our case, we created a controller named say, so the views will be in the directory app/views/say. To complete our Hello, World! application, let's create a template. By default, Rails looks for templates in a file with the same name as the action it's handling. In our case, that means we need to create a file called hello.rhtml in the directory app/views/say. (Why .rhtml? We'll explain in a minute.) For now, let's just put some basic HTML in there.
&lt;html&gt;&lt;head&gt;&lt;title&gt;Hello, Rails!&lt;/title&gt;&lt;/head&gt; &lt;body&gt;
&lt;h1&gt;Hello from Rails and SDF!&lt;/h1&gt; &lt;/body&gt; &lt;/html&gt;
<html><head><title>Hello, Rails!</title></head> <body>
<h1>Hello from Rails and SDF!</h1> </body> </html>
Save the file hello.rhtml, and refresh your browser window. You should see it display our friendly greeting. Notice that we didn't have to restart the application to see the update. During development, Rails automatically integrates changes into the running application as you save files.

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@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ You can then add a passphrase to your key, and use just that one passphrase when
The key comment is for your personal convenience, I reccomend youruser@yourlocalmachine and maybe the date, but of course it's up to you. Now save both the private and public key file somewhere (My Documents is a good choice, but pick somewhere that only *you* will have read access to.)
Next, you need to configure PuTTY to use this key. Fire up PuTTY and load your session or create a new one. Then in the Category list on the left, selecct Connection &gt; SSH &gt; Auth. Browse for your key and load it up. Also, you'll want to allow changes of username if your SDF account name is different from your local one.
Next, you need to configure PuTTY to use this key. Fire up PuTTY and load your session or create a new one. Then in the Category list on the left, selecct Connection > SSH > Auth. Browse for your key and load it up. Also, you'll want to allow changes of username if your SDF account name is different from your local one.
You're almost done! Now you need to let the server know about your new key. After you do this, the ssh, scp and sftp programs will use the key files automatically. So (optionally, but it is recommended) save your session, and then connect. Now do the following to authorize your key:

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@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ You can then add a passphrase to your key, and use just that one passphrase when
The key comment is for your personal convenience, I reccomend youruser@yourlocalmachine and maybe the date, but of course it's up to you. Now save both the private and public key file somewhere (My Documents is a good choice, but pick somewhere that only *you* will have read access to.)
Next, you need to configure PuTTY to use this key. Fire up PuTTY and load your session or create a new one. Then in the Category list on the left, selecct Connection &gt; SSH &gt; Auth. Browse for your key and load it up. Also, you'll want to allow changes of username if your SDF account name is different from your local one.
Next, you need to configure PuTTY to use this key. Fire up PuTTY and load your session or create a new one. Then in the Category list on the left, selecct Connection > SSH > Auth. Browse for your key and load it up. Also, you'll want to allow changes of username if your SDF account name is different from your local one.
You're almost done! Now you need to let the server know about your new key. After you do this, the ssh, scp and sftp programs will use the key files automatically. So (optionally, but it is recommended) save your session, and then connect. Now do the following to authorize your key:

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@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ One of the first things you will want to do is change the default root password
It is a good habit to create a regular user account for working, using su to obtain root privileges as needed. To create a regular user account:
useradd -Gwheel &lt;username&gt;
useradd -Gwheel <username>
This user will be able to perform administrative tasks by runing //su// to obtain superuser privileges using the root password. CentOS ships with sudo installed, so adding the new user to wheel group and editing /etc/sudoers with //visudo// to uncoment the following line:
@ -20,9 +20,9 @@ This user will be able to perform administrative tasks by runing //su// to obtai
===== Networking =====
You will need to ssh into the vps control panel server that you were given in your welcome email which should have the format of //vps&lt;number&gt;.sdf.org//.
You will need to ssh into the vps control panel server that you were given in your welcome email which should have the format of //vps<number>.sdf.org//.
Once logged into your control panel you will see a line at the top of the screen that details your chosen Operating System and IP Address.\\ //VPS Maintenance Shell for &lt;os&gt; (205.166.94.xxx)//\\ This information will be important for setting up your server to have network access.
Once logged into your control panel you will see a line at the top of the screen that details your chosen Operating System and IP Address.\\ //VPS Maintenance Shell for <os> (205.166.94.xxx)//\\ This information will be important for setting up your server to have network access.
Start your server, and log in via the console. (default= root:rootroot)

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@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ After logging in to your VPS for the first time, please change this password to
It is a good habit to create a regular user account for working, using "su" to obtain root privileges as needed. To create a regular user account:
useradd -m &lt;username&gt;
useradd -m <username>
This user will be able to perform administrative tasks by runing "su" to obtain superuser privileges using the root password.
@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ Refer to the following article to see how to clean up (remove packages) from you
Disable IPv6:
# echo "blacklist ipv6" &gt;&gt; /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
# echo "blacklist ipv6" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
Edit rules:
@ -117,14 +117,14 @@ Edit rules:
Load rules (now):
# iptables -F
# iptables-restore &lt; /etc/firewall
# iptables-restore < /etc/firewall
Load rules (boot):
# vi /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/firewall
#!/bin/sh
/sbin/iptables-restore &lt; /etc/firewall
/sbin/iptables-restore < /etc/firewall
# chmod 755 /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/firewall

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@ -13,11 +13,11 @@ One of the first things you will want to do is change the default root password
It is also a good habit to create a regular user account for working, using "su" to obtain root privileges as needed. To create a regular user account which is part of the administrative "wheel" group:
useradd -m -G wheel &lt;username&gt;
useradd -m -G wheel <username>
Then immediately set its password with:
passwd &lt;username&gt;
passwd <username>
This user will be in the "wheel" group and will be able to perform administrative tasks by runing "su" to obtain superuser privileges using the root password.
@ -77,11 +77,11 @@ It is read only.
To set this up on boot, execute the steps above and then:
echo "nfs_client=YES" &gt;&gt; /etc/rc.conf
echo "rpcbind=YES" &gt;&gt; /etc/rc.conf
echo "10.1.0.1 vps" &gt;&gt; /etc/hosts
echo "vps:/pkgshare /pkgshare nfs ro" &gt;&gt; /etc/fstab
echo "export PATH=$PATH:/usr/pkg/bin:/usr/pkg/sbin" &gt;&gt; /etc/profile
echo "nfs_client=YES" >> /etc/rc.conf
echo "rpcbind=YES" >> /etc/rc.conf
echo "10.1.0.1 vps" >> /etc/hosts
echo "vps:/pkgshare /pkgshare nfs ro" >> /etc/fstab
echo "export PATH=$PATH:/usr/pkg/bin:/usr/pkg/sbin" >> /etc/profile
Note that you cannot use both this pre-built pkgsrc and pre-built packages from netbsd.org. It may be possible to set the system up so you can, however this is best left to the experienced NetBSD administrator.
@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ First, check which distribution sets are installed:
Decide which sets you want to remove and examine their contents. For example, to remove games and all X11 sets:
for set in games xbase xcomp xetc xfont xserver ; do \
tar tzf /usr/INSTALL/$set.tgz | sed -e 's/^\.//' &gt;&gt; /tmp/purgelist ; \
tar tzf /usr/INSTALL/$set.tgz | sed -e 's/^\.//' >> /tmp/purgelist ; \
done
After examining "/tmp/purgelist" and removing any files you want to keep, do:

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@ -27,9 +27,9 @@ The next step is to create the user and group that the server will run as, and a
"# groupadd -g 17 slapd
# useradd -u 17 -g 17 -d /var/chroot/openldap slapd
# grep slapd /etc/master.passwd &gt; /var/chroot/openldap/etc/master.passwd
# grep slapd /etc/master.passwd > /var/chroot/openldap/etc/master.passwd
# pwd_mkdb -d /var/chroot/openldap /var/chroot/openldap/etc/master.passwd
# grep slapd /etc/group &gt; /var/chroot/openldap/etc/group"
# grep slapd /etc/group > /var/chroot/openldap/etc/group"
No password needs to be set for the slapd user as no one will ever log in using its username. This disallows logins from that user.
@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ The "-u" and "-g" flags are used to specify the user and group that "slapd" shou
Finally, it is necessary to enable "slapd" in the "rc.conf" file.
"# echo "slapd=YES" &gt;&gt; /etc/rc.conf"
"# echo "slapd=YES" >> /etc/rc.conf"
You can edit the file manually and add this line if you would like to keep your "rc.conf" organised in some way.

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@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Activities of the SDF Plan9 Boot Camp include:
* Self Guided Discoveries in: acme, sam, abaco, mothra and man
* Self Guided Discoveries in: mapdemo, catclock, juggle and tetris
* Self Guided Discoveries in: 9front and contrib via ftpfs
* Self Guided Discoveries in: 9fans mailing list and faces During the SDF Plan9 Boot Camp you are encouraged to make screenshots and vidoes of your Self Guided Discoveries and share your experiences on plan9-l to inspire others to do the same.===== Install =====After you have been allocated a VPS slice, connect by "ssh //&lt;SDF member ID&gt;//@//&lt;VPS slice&gt;//.sdf.org" (for example, "ssh papa@vps2.sdf.org"; you may omit your SDF member ID and the "@" if you are connecting from your SDF shell account). Your password is the same as your SDF member log-in.At the VPS console and type "x".If asked install from the ISO type "no". At some point there was an option to install from Plan9 iso image; at the time of updating the tutorial it does not ask for that option anymore.
* Self Guided Discoveries in: 9fans mailing list and faces During the SDF Plan9 Boot Camp you are encouraged to make screenshots and vidoes of your Self Guided Discoveries and share your experiences on plan9-l to inspire others to do the same.===== Install =====After you have been allocated a VPS slice, connect by "ssh //<SDF member ID>//@//<VPS slice>//.sdf.org" (for example, "ssh papa@vps2.sdf.org"; you may omit your SDF member ID and the "@" if you are connecting from your SDF shell account). Your password is the same as your SDF member log-in.At the VPS console and type "x".If asked install from the ISO type "no". At some point there was an option to install from Plan9 iso image; at the time of updating the tutorial it does not ask for that option anymore.
Do you wish to continue? (yes/no) yes
Would you like to install Plan9 yourself from the ISO? (yes/no)
% Copying a fresh plan9 image [PLEASE WAIT]
@ -41,9 +41,9 @@ Activities of the SDF Plan9 Boot Camp include:
* **ctl-h** is backspace, kind of. **ctl-u** erases the current line. As with backspace, screen output may not be what you expect.
* To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, Press **ctl-]** to close the console, then press 'q' to disconnect. You can return again by **ssh**ing to your allocated VPS server again (see [[#install|above]]) and getting back to the VPS console, and pressing 'c' to connect.
* The only line editor installed by default in the Plan 9 Image. is **//ed//**. For initially setting your DNS below or other tasks before you get DrawTerm running, [[https://www.howtoforge.com/linux-ed-command/|read this tutorial]] for this excrutiating experience (but then you can install DrawTerm). ===== Networking ========= Configuring Your IP Address ====In your control panel at "vps3.sdf.org", note YOUR_IP (e.g. 205.166.94.x) on the top line.Start your server, and log in via the console. (default=glenda)At the "rc" prompt (%), enter: "ip/ipconfig -g 205.166.94.1 ether /net/ether0 YOUR_IP 255.255.255.0"This configuration lasts until you reboot Plan 9. To make this permanent it is recommended to add this line to your /rc/bin/termrc.local file.To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, see [[#know|above]].==== DNS Resolution ====You can get DNS resolution by editing "/lib/ndb/local" and changing: "ip=127.0.0.1 sys=localhost dom=localhost"to "ip=YOUR_IP sys=plan9 dom=plan9 dns=205.166.94.20"Once you've done that, from "rc" type "ndb/cs
ndb/dns -r"This configuration lasts until you reboot Plan 9. To make this permanent it is recommended to add those two lines to your /rc/bin/termrc.local file.To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, see [[#know|above]].===== Drawterm =====Drawterm is essentially a BLIT terminal emulator which allows you to connect to your Plan9 system and load the //rio// windowing system. Rio is a direct successor of UNIX 'layers' and Plan 9 '8½'.At the "rc" prompt (%) in your Plan 9 VPS, enter these two lines. "echo 'key proto=p9sk1 dom=plan9 user=glenda !password=PASSWORD' &gt;/mnt/factotum/ctl
ndb/dns -r"This configuration lasts until you reboot Plan 9. To make this permanent it is recommended to add those two lines to your /rc/bin/termrc.local file.To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, see [[#know|above]].===== Drawterm =====Drawterm is essentially a BLIT terminal emulator which allows you to connect to your Plan9 system and load the //rio// windowing system. Rio is a direct successor of UNIX 'layers' and Plan 9 '8½'.At the "rc" prompt (%) in your Plan 9 VPS, enter these two lines. "echo 'key proto=p9sk1 dom=plan9 user=glenda !password=PASSWORD' >/mnt/factotum/ctl
aux/listen1 -t tcp!*!ncpu /bin/cpu -R &amp;
"Replace PASSWORD with the password you want. This password lasts until you reboot Plan 9.To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, see [[#know|above]].==== Getting Started with Drawterm ===={{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/drawterm.png}}\\ Follow the [[https://web.archive.org/web/20120121090252/http://jgw.tx0.org/howto/building_drawterm.html|instructions]] to download and build Drawterm for your operating system. YOUR_IP must match the IP address described in [[#networking|Networking]].\\ "./drawterm -a YOUR_IP -c YOUR_IP -u glenda"After typing your password, press the right button of your mouse. A menu should appear. Then, release the button over the "New" option.\\ Now, press the right button again near the upper-left corner of drawterm, and drag the mouse to the lower right before releasing the button, drawing a rectangle.\\ You should now have a terminal window. The first thing you should probably do is to type "cat readme.rio" (or read it from [[http://sdf.org/tutorials/misc/readme.rio|here]])===== Plan 9 Applications ========= Browsing the Web ====You can use [[http://lab-fgb.com/abaco/|Abaco]] to browse the web. (Abaco is available in a default Plan 9 system.)You'll need to have your IP configured and DNS working in order to browse the web. After that, you'll have to run "webfs" and **then** "abaco". (You may want to add "webfs" in your "$home/lib/profile" just before plumber and rio; also, if you don't have a "$home/lib/webcookies" file, touch it.){{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/abaco.png?600px}}When abaco starts, you can go to a webpage by clicking ""New"" with the middle button of the mouse, typing the address in the row below the one with ""Del Snarf Get …"" (see the previous figure: it's the one where the current address is), and pressing "Enter" on your keyboard. You can follow links by clicking on them, as is usual, with the left button (the shape of the cursor won't change, though).===== Adding a User =====You may wish to add a user to your system once you get the hang of things. There is really no need to create a new user when you are first starting out. To create a new user, you will have to connect to the file server console by typing: "con -l /srv/fscons"Now, at the file server prompt, create a new user. Replace USER with what you want your new user to be named: "uname USER USER"You will need to add that user to the "sys" group if you want it to be able to change system configuration files. Again, change USER to what your new user name is: "uname sys +USER"Exit the file server console by typing: "ctrl+\". You will now be at a "&gt;&gt;&gt;" prompt; type "q" to quit.===== Configure Time zone =====**Taken from [[http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Installation_instructions/index.html|Plan 9 Wiki Installation Instructions]]**You might want to configure your system's timezone. Figure out in which timezone you are, and then, assuming e.g. you are in the CET zone log in as user adm, then: "cp /adm/timezone/CET /adm/timezone/local"Last, but not the least, you may also want to edit/change the "TIMESYNCARGS" in your "/rc/bin/termrc" or "/rc/bin/cpurc"; for example, to use an NTP service, set it to: "TIMESYNCARGS=(-n 0-north-america.pool.ntp.org)" and reboot. ===== Working in Plan 9 =====TODO check if title worksNow that you are connected to your Plan 9 console with your new user you should run: "/sys/lib/newuser"And setup a password for the user in factotum so you can login from Drawterm.**Taken from [[http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Installation_instructions/index.html|Plan 9 Wiki Installation Instructions]]**When you drawterm to a Plan 9 cpu server, your local files will be available at /mnt/term. This means you can freely copy files between Plan 9 and your other os without the use of any additional protocols. In other words, when working with drawterm, your environment is actually a composite of your local os and the Plan 9 system - technically it is a three node grid, because the Drawterm program acts as an ultra-minimal independent Plan 9 terminal system, connecting your host os to the Plan 9 cpu server.===== Useful Plan9 Commands =====While there are many similarities between UNIX and Plan9, there are specific commands which may be unfamiliar to UNIX users. However, some of these commands have their roots in early UNIX systems as well as BTL Research UNIX.
"Replace PASSWORD with the password you want. This password lasts until you reboot Plan 9.To exit Plan 9 and be able to return **without** rebooting your server, see [[#know|above]].==== Getting Started with Drawterm ===={{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/drawterm.png}}\\ Follow the [[https://web.archive.org/web/20120121090252/http://jgw.tx0.org/howto/building_drawterm.html|instructions]] to download and build Drawterm for your operating system. YOUR_IP must match the IP address described in [[#networking|Networking]].\\ "./drawterm -a YOUR_IP -c YOUR_IP -u glenda"After typing your password, press the right button of your mouse. A menu should appear. Then, release the button over the "New" option.\\ Now, press the right button again near the upper-left corner of drawterm, and drag the mouse to the lower right before releasing the button, drawing a rectangle.\\ You should now have a terminal window. The first thing you should probably do is to type "cat readme.rio" (or read it from [[http://sdf.org/tutorials/misc/readme.rio|here]])===== Plan 9 Applications ========= Browsing the Web ====You can use [[http://lab-fgb.com/abaco/|Abaco]] to browse the web. (Abaco is available in a default Plan 9 system.)You'll need to have your IP configured and DNS working in order to browse the web. After that, you'll have to run "webfs" and **then** "abaco". (You may want to add "webfs" in your "$home/lib/profile" just before plumber and rio; also, if you don't have a "$home/lib/webcookies" file, touch it.){{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/abaco.png?600px}}When abaco starts, you can go to a webpage by clicking ""New"" with the middle button of the mouse, typing the address in the row below the one with ""Del Snarf Get …"" (see the previous figure: it's the one where the current address is), and pressing "Enter" on your keyboard. You can follow links by clicking on them, as is usual, with the left button (the shape of the cursor won't change, though).===== Adding a User =====You may wish to add a user to your system once you get the hang of things. There is really no need to create a new user when you are first starting out. To create a new user, you will have to connect to the file server console by typing: "con -l /srv/fscons"Now, at the file server prompt, create a new user. Replace USER with what you want your new user to be named: "uname USER USER"You will need to add that user to the "sys" group if you want it to be able to change system configuration files. Again, change USER to what your new user name is: "uname sys +USER"Exit the file server console by typing: "ctrl+\". You will now be at a ">>>" prompt; type "q" to quit.===== Configure Time zone =====**Taken from [[http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Installation_instructions/index.html|Plan 9 Wiki Installation Instructions]]**You might want to configure your system's timezone. Figure out in which timezone you are, and then, assuming e.g. you are in the CET zone log in as user adm, then: "cp /adm/timezone/CET /adm/timezone/local"Last, but not the least, you may also want to edit/change the "TIMESYNCARGS" in your "/rc/bin/termrc" or "/rc/bin/cpurc"; for example, to use an NTP service, set it to: "TIMESYNCARGS=(-n 0-north-america.pool.ntp.org)" and reboot. ===== Working in Plan 9 =====TODO check if title worksNow that you are connected to your Plan 9 console with your new user you should run: "/sys/lib/newuser"And setup a password for the user in factotum so you can login from Drawterm.**Taken from [[http://plan9.bell-labs.com/wiki/plan9/Installation_instructions/index.html|Plan 9 Wiki Installation Instructions]]**When you drawterm to a Plan 9 cpu server, your local files will be available at /mnt/term. This means you can freely copy files between Plan 9 and your other os without the use of any additional protocols. In other words, when working with drawterm, your environment is actually a composite of your local os and the Plan 9 system - technically it is a three node grid, because the Drawterm program acts as an ultra-minimal independent Plan 9 terminal system, connecting your host os to the Plan 9 cpu server.===== Useful Plan9 Commands =====While there are many similarities between UNIX and Plan9, there are specific commands which may be unfamiliar to UNIX users. However, some of these commands have their roots in early UNIX systems as well as BTL Research UNIX.
* //**fshalt -h**// - This will gracefully shutdown Plan 9
* //**ed**// - This archaic line editor is the only one installed by default in the Plan 9 Image. For initially setting your DNS above or other tasks before you get DrawTerm running, [[https://www.howtoforge.com/linux-ed-command/|read this tutorial]] for this excrutiating experience (but then you can install DrawTerm).===== Links ========= Tutorials ====
* [[http://sdf.org/?tutorials/VPS_Plan9|Plan 9 on SDF VPS]]

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@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ There is [[http://sdf.org/?tutorials/anonradio-nicecast|an SDF tutorial for sett
To stream during your timeslot or during openmic, create a playlist of your desired songs:
"ls -d -1 /PATH/TO/YOUR/MUSIC/*.* &gt;&gt; playlist.m3u"
"ls -d -1 /PATH/TO/YOUR/MUSIC/*.* >> playlist.m3u"
Copy the default ezstream config to your home directory:
@ -56,16 +56,16 @@ Copy the default ezstream config to your home directory:
Edit your newly copied config thusly:
&lt;ezstream&gt;
&lt;url&gt;http://anonradio.net:8010/YOUR_DJ_MOUNT_NAME&lt;/url&gt;
&lt;sourceuser&gt;YOUR_DJ_USER_NAME&lt;/sourceuser&gt;
&lt;sourcepassword&gt;YOUR_DJ_PASSWORD&lt;/sourcepassword&gt;
&lt;format&gt;MP3&lt;/format&gt;
&lt;filename&gt;/PATH/TO/YOUR/playlist.m3u&lt;/filename&gt;
&lt;svrinfobitrate&gt;192&lt;/svrinfobitrate&gt;
&lt;svrinfosamplerate&gt;44100&lt;/svrinfosamplerate&gt;
&lt;stream_once&gt;1&lt;/stream_once&gt;
&lt;/ezstream&gt;
<ezstream>
<url>http://anonradio.net:8010/YOUR_DJ_MOUNT_NAME</url>
<sourceuser>YOUR_DJ_USER_NAME</sourceuser>
<sourcepassword>YOUR_DJ_PASSWORD</sourcepassword>
<format>MP3</format>
<filename>/PATH/TO/YOUR/playlist.m3u</filename>
<svrinfobitrate>192</svrinfobitrate>
<svrinfosamplerate>44100</svrinfosamplerate>
<stream_once>1</stream_once>
</ezstream>
And start your stream with this command:
@ -73,25 +73,25 @@ And start your stream with this command:
If you are streaming a group of varying format files, you can homogenize them like this:
&lt;ezstream&gt;
&lt;url&gt;http://anonradio.net:8010/YOUR_DJ_MOUNT_NAME&lt;/url&gt;
&lt;sourceuser&gt;openmic&lt;/YOUR_DJ_USER_NAME&gt;
&lt;sourcepassword&gt;YOUR_DJ_PASSWORD&lt;/sourcepassword&gt;
&lt;format&gt;MP3&lt;/format&gt;
&lt;filename&gt;/PATH/TO/YOUR/playlist.m3u&lt;/filename&gt;
&lt;svrinfobitrate&gt;192&lt;/svrinfobitrate&gt;
&lt;svrinfosamplerate&gt;44100&lt;/svrinfosamplerate&gt;
&lt;stream_once&gt;1&lt;/stream_once&gt;
&lt;reencode&gt;
&lt;enable&gt;1&lt;/enable&gt;
&lt;encdec&gt;
&lt;format&gt;MP3&lt;/format&gt;
&lt;match&gt;.mp3&lt;/match&gt;
&lt;decode&gt;/usr/pkg/bin/madplay -v -Q -i -b 16 -R 44100 -S -o raw:- @T@&lt;/decode&gt;
&lt;encode&gt;/usr/pkg/bin/lame --preset cbr 192 -r -s 44.1 --bitwidth 16 - -&lt;/encode&gt;
&lt;/encdec&gt;
&lt;/reencode&gt;
&lt;/ezstream&gt;
<ezstream>
<url>http://anonradio.net:8010/YOUR_DJ_MOUNT_NAME</url>
<sourceuser>openmic</YOUR_DJ_USER_NAME>
<sourcepassword>YOUR_DJ_PASSWORD</sourcepassword>
<format>MP3</format>
<filename>/PATH/TO/YOUR/playlist.m3u</filename>
<svrinfobitrate>192</svrinfobitrate>
<svrinfosamplerate>44100</svrinfosamplerate>
<stream_once>1</stream_once>
<reencode>
<enable>1</enable>
<encdec>
<format>MP3</format>
<match>.mp3</match>
<decode>/usr/pkg/bin/madplay -v -Q -i -b 16 -R 44100 -S -o raw:- @T@</decode>
<encode>/usr/pkg/bin/lame --preset cbr 192 -r -s 44.1 --bitwidth 16 - -</encode>
</encdec>
</reencode>
</ezstream>
There are also[[http://mustafejen.freeshell.org/ezpulse.html|instructions]] for streaming with ezstream on Debian using PulseAudio.

View File

@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ For Nicecasting purposes I find it's better to control your mic gain at the syst
{{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/nicecast-systemaudio.png}}
Keep this "System Preferences &gt; Sound" window open. If you don't have a headset then you can probably use audio jack earphones and your computer's built-in microphone. Or, just a USB mic plus audio jack earphones. Etc. The idea is to prevent the computer's input from taking in the computer's output (feedback).
Keep this "System Preferences > Sound" window open. If you don't have a headset then you can probably use audio jack earphones and your computer's built-in microphone. Or, just a USB mic plus audio jack earphones. Etc. The idea is to prevent the computer's input from taking in the computer's output (feedback).
===== II. Open Nicecast and set it up =====
@ -60,9 +60,9 @@ Click "Start Broadcast" on the Nicecast Broadcast window! The archived mp3 shoul
{{http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/nicecast-voiceover.png}}
Make sure your VoiceOver plugin is started. Make sure your mic input is turned up at the system level in your "System Preferences &gt; Sound" window. You should hear the iTines mp3 and an echo-back of your own voice through your headset. Make sure the LeveL indicator in the Nicecast Broadcast window is active, depending on what audio is being fed to it.
Make sure your VoiceOver plugin is started. Make sure your mic input is turned up at the system level in your "System Preferences > Sound" window. You should hear the iTines mp3 and an echo-back of your own voice through your headset. Make sure the LeveL indicator in the Nicecast Broadcast window is active, depending on what audio is being fed to it.
Now let's try Skype. While letting iTunes play on, go to Skype, call your "Skype call testing service" contact, and do what it says (leave a message). Probably you will hear iTunes automatically turn itself down while Skype is going -- I think this is a function of Skype, and it's possible this can be changed in preferences. Yep -- under Preferences &gt; General, if you like, de-check "pause iTunes during calls".
Now let's try Skype. While letting iTunes play on, go to Skype, call your "Skype call testing service" contact, and do what it says (leave a message). Probably you will hear iTunes automatically turn itself down while Skype is going -- I think this is a function of Skype, and it's possible this can be changed in preferences. Yep -- under Preferences > General, if you like, de-check "pause iTunes during calls".
You can try playing with other apps like video games, a movie player, etc etc, and locally outputting the sound. Nicecast should capture it all and send it out, along with your voice-over!

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@ -16,10 +16,10 @@ Don't know how to do that? Fear not! Below are instructions for how to do that w
=== VLC media player (http://videolan.org) ===
- File -&gt; Open Network
- File -> Open Network
- enter: http://anonradio.net:8000/anonradio
To get around occasional drops in the stream which may occur when DJs/programs are changing, select Playback -&gt; Repeat One.
To get around occasional drops in the stream which may occur when DJs/programs are changing, select Playback -> Repeat One.
==== On MacOSX ====

View File

@ -99,10 +99,10 @@ Some Simple Encryption by tfurrows
205
210 FOR I = 1 to LEN(M$)
215 C=C+1
220 IF C&gt;16 THEN C=1
220 IF C>16 THEN C=1
225 L = POS(A$(C),SUBSTR(M$,I,1),1)
230 IF L &lt; LEN(A$(C)) THEN PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),L+1,LEN(A$(C))-L);
235 IF L &gt; 1 THEN PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),1,L) ELSE PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),1,1)
230 IF L < LEN(A$(C)) THEN PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),L+1,LEN(A$(C))-L);
235 IF L > 1 THEN PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),1,L) ELSE PRINT SUBSTR(A$(C),1,1)
240 NEXT i
"

View File

@ -4,11 +4,11 @@ The "bboard" is a threaded multi discussion bulletin board. It goes back when th
===== Some relevant bboards =====
* To ask for help, use **"&lt;HELPDESK&gt;"** to have your query answered by another user
* All system notices are posted on **"&lt;ANNOUNCE&gt;"**
* Current discussions about SDF-EU happen on **"&lt;SDFEU&gt;"**
* You can make requests for new software and discuss account issues at **"&lt;REQUESTS&gt;"**
* **"&lt;ARPA&gt;"** and **"&lt;META&gt;"** boards are used for ARPA and MetaARPA related questions.
* To ask for help, use **"<HELPDESK>"** to have your query answered by another user
* All system notices are posted on **"<ANNOUNCE>"**
* Current discussions about SDF-EU happen on **"<SDFEU>"**
* You can make requests for new software and discuss account issues at **"<REQUESTS>"**
* **"<ARPA>"** and **"<META>"** boards are used for ARPA and MetaARPA related questions.
* Member services (such as VPN or VOIP) have their own board for questions and support.
===== Getting around =====
@ -30,11 +30,11 @@ Type "bboard" on your shell. You will be presented with a list of current bboard
[ SCROLL (F)ORWARD, (B)ACKWARD - (G)OTO or (Q)UIT ]
To navigate the boards listings, use "F" (Forward) and "B" (Backward) keys to go up and down. When you reach the end of the list (or you press "Q"), you will enter in Command Mode, and a prompt will be presented to you. Every time you run "bboard" you are placed in the **"&lt;GENERAL&gt;"** board by default, hence the prompt "&lt;GENERAL&gt; Command: ".
To navigate the boards listings, use "F" (Forward) and "B" (Backward) keys to go up and down. When you reach the end of the list (or you press "Q"), you will enter in Command Mode, and a prompt will be presented to you. Every time you run "bboard" you are placed in the **"<GENERAL>"** board by default, hence the prompt "<GENERAL> Command: ".
==== Browsing messages ====
Say you want to review the **"&lt;SDFEU&gt;"** bboard for news about SDF-EU. On the Command Mode, type "G" (GOTO) followed of the name of the bboard (in this case "G → SDFEU") You will enter in Posts Listing, with all entries at the **"&lt;SDFEU&gt;"** bboard sorted by activity (most recent first)
Say you want to review the **"<SDFEU>"** bboard for news about SDF-EU. On the Command Mode, type "G" (GOTO) followed of the name of the bboard (in this case "G → SDFEU") You will enter in Posts Listing, with all entries at the **"<SDFEU>"** bboard sorted by activity (most recent first)
================================================================================
[ID] [DATE] [AUTHOR] [REP] [SUBJECT]
@ -64,22 +64,22 @@ Post #3 “Meetup at EuroBSCcon” caught your attention. To read it, press "T"
Anybody wanting to organize a meetup @EuroBSDcon?
&lt;SDF.3.0&gt;(3)[ &lt;ENTER&gt; to follow thread, (R)EPLY or (Q)UIT ]
<SDF.3.0>(3)[ <ENTER> to follow thread, (R)EPLY or (Q)UIT ]
==== Post a message/reply ====
To post a new thread on the bboard you are currently in, press "P" (POST) and enter a subject. To publicly reply to a post, press "R" (REPLY) If you are in Reading Mode, you will reply to the thread you are currently in. If you are in Posts Listing, you will be asked for the post number you want to reply. Either way you will end up in the pico editor <sup>[[#fn__1|]]</sup>. Write down your reply and press "CTRL-x" to finish you post.
^ New Post ^
| &lt;SDFEU.1&gt; Command: POST Subject: Timezone? You have written: ----------------------------------------------------------- In which timezone(s) SDF-EU servers are? This BULLETIN contains 40 characters in 6 words of 2 lines. ----------------------------------------------------------- POST your BULLETIN? (y/n) % Rebuilding symbol table for BBOARD:&lt;SDFEU&gt; [QUEUED] Would you like to add a READERS POLL? (y/n) |
| <SDFEU.1> Command: POST Subject: Timezone? You have written: ----------------------------------------------------------- In which timezone(s) SDF-EU servers are? This BULLETIN contains 40 characters in 6 words of 2 lines. ----------------------------------------------------------- POST your BULLETIN? (y/n) % Rebuilding symbol table for BBOARD:<SDFEU> [QUEUED] Would you like to add a READERS POLL? (y/n) |
^ Reply ^
| &lt;SDFEU.1&gt; Command: REPLY (A NUMBER) 3 REPLY to "Meetup at EuroBSDcon" ? (y/n) You have replied: ----------------------------------------------------------- I would love to! This BULLETIN contains 16 characters in 4 words of 2 lines. ----------------------------------------------------------- POST your REPLY? (y/n) |
| <SDFEU.1> Command: REPLY (A NUMBER) 3 REPLY to "Meetup at EuroBSDcon" ? (y/n) You have replied: ----------------------------------------------------------- I would love to! This BULLETIN contains 16 characters in 4 words of 2 lines. ----------------------------------------------------------- POST your REPLY? (y/n) |
==== ...and much more ====
Now that you are confortable with the bboard, try exploring additional features:
* Post ("P"), reply ("R") and depost ("D") a message (use the **"&lt;TEST&gt;"** board for that)
* Post ("P"), reply ("R") and depost ("D") a message (use the **"<TEST>"** board for that)
* Review current voting polls ("V") or propose your own.
* Explore the archives ("A") and acquire ancient wisdom.
* See how many people are reading the bboard ("W") and get amazed by their idle times.

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@ -7,19 +7,19 @@ In this tutorial when text looks like "this" this means it's a command you can r
==== Getting Started ====
* "mkhomepg" - This command needs to be executed before you can start building your web pages. When you execute this program, it will create a directory in which you can put all your web files. This directory is sym-linked into your home directory, under the name 'html'. (A sym-link is sort of like a shortcut in Microsoft Windows.)You will be prompted to select a URL for your website. This URL is what other internet users type into their web browser to view your web pages. If you're not an ARPA member then you may only use url's in the form of '"&lt;your login&gt;.freeshell.org"'. For instance, my web pages are stored at '"alterego.freeshell.org"'. If you're an ARPA member, there are many different domains you may use.
* "mkhomepg" - This command needs to be executed before you can start building your web pages. When you execute this program, it will create a directory in which you can put all your web files. This directory is sym-linked into your home directory, under the name 'html'. (A sym-link is sort of like a shortcut in Microsoft Windows.)You will be prompted to select a URL for your website. This URL is what other internet users type into their web browser to view your web pages. If you're not an ARPA member then you may only use url's in the form of '"<your login>.freeshell.org"'. For instance, my web pages are stored at '"alterego.freeshell.org"'. If you're an ARPA member, there are many different domains you may use.
===== Your First Page! =====
Creating your first page is **__SO__** easy! First you'll need to open a text editor. SDF has many text editors installed but new users to UNIX often find that "nano" is the easiest to work with.
* "nano ~/html/index.html" - This command starts the nano text editor, creating a new file, called 'index.html' in your html directory.Once you've executed the command above. You'll notice that the terminal layout has changed. If you press keys on your keyboard you'll notice they appear in the "text buffer". Write out the text below into this program.
&lt;html&gt;&lt;head&gt;
&lt;title&gt;My First Page!&lt;/title&gt;
&lt;/head&gt;&lt;body&gt;
&lt;h1&gt;My First Page!&lt;/h1&gt;
&lt;p&gt;This is my first html web page!&lt;/p&gt;
&lt;/body&gt;&lt;/html&gt;
<html><head>
<title>My First Page!</title>
</head><body>
<h1>My First Page!</h1>
<p>This is my first html web page!</p>
</body></html>
Now that you have copied the text out into 'nano', you need to save the file. To do this, hold down the 'CTRL' key on your keyboard and whilst pressing that, press the letter 'o'.Right, now, do you remember that URL you selected when you ran '"mkhomepg"'? Open a web browser and type that into the address bar. Hopefully, after a few seconds. You should see your very own web page!
===== Problems =====

View File

@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
is about the easiest way to print a file. Also:
_c_a_t _f_i_l_e_l _f_i_l_e_2 _&gt;_f_i_l_e_3
_c_a_t _f_i_l_e_l _f_i_l_e_2 _>_f_i_l_e_3
is about the easiest way to concatenate files.

View File

@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ Share permanent files with other 6500 users.
===== File Transfer =====
In order to transfer data to or from the 6500, your best option is to copy and paste. If your having trouble pasting in programs, you may want to try using TeraTerm with after altering the line delay under Setup -&gt; Additonal settings -&gt; Copy and Paste -&gt; Paste delay per line at about 250ms.
In order to transfer data to or from the 6500, your best option is to copy and paste. If your having trouble pasting in programs, you may want to try using TeraTerm with after altering the line delay under Setup -> Additonal settings -> Copy and Paste -> Paste delay per line at about 250ms.
===== References =====

View File

@ -21,13 +21,13 @@ To play with Chicken, start the interactive interpreter by running csi. It shoul
netbsd-unix-gnu-x86-64 [ 64bit manyargs dload ptables ]
compiled 2011-08-24 on ol (NetBSD)
#;1&gt;
#;1>
At the Chicken prompt, you can type in a Scheme program and hit Return to run your code.
#;1&gt; (print "Hello, World")
#;1> (print "Hello, World")
Hello, World
#;2&gt;
#;2>
===== Install Eggs =====

View File

@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ Now, type **l** (lower case L) to see a list of rooms. The output will look some
There seems to be a lot of users in the room "spacebar". Let us join in on the fun, shall we? Type **g** and the name of the room to join.
:goto&gt; spacebar
:goto> spacebar
When entering the room, a list of users will be displayed. Now, let us say hello to the room.
@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ Enter **a space** to enter input mode. When entering input mode, **a prompt of y
The next thing you'll probably want to know is what people talked about before you entered so you can join in the chatter. Type **r** to get a short 18 line "r"eview of what was said last. If you want more context, press **R**. You will se a prompt like this:
:lines&gt;
:lines>
Just type the number of lines you are interested in and finish with return; you'll get a scrollable history of said lines length.
@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ When you are ready to quit, type **q** to leave com. You will see an **"Unlinkin
===== FAQ =====
How do I use backspace in com?Try **-** in command mode in com to toggle behavior. Or, use stty or 'bksp' to set the backspace correctly.How can I be in com multiple times?The basic rule is to be on a different server when entering com. Some common ways of doing this is to use screen, run ssh twice, etc.How do I send private messages?Use the **s** command in command mode: **s**user@host. Please note the @host portion; this is a required element of the command. If the user is in another room, add an optional host parameter to send the message: **s**user@host room.How do I see what happened in the past?Use the **r** key to review. Use **R** followed by a number to control how many lines of history to review. The **p** key can be used to see the history of another room: **p**roomname. The **p** command can also take an optional number of lines to display: **p**roomname number.How do I see who is in another room?Use **W** (upper case w) to see who is in another room.I see "&lt;wliao@iceland DUMPs in 22 characters of 2 words in 3 lines&gt;". What does that mean?Use the **r** or **R** command.I see "&lt;wliao appears&gt;". How do I do that?Use the **e**mote command in command mode. Use **e** followed by the action at the prompt: ":emote&gt; tests this out". Why do I have to keep pressing the spacebar to talk?Other keys can be used to enter input mode. Try the **h** to see what keys are not being used such as the enter key.How do I erase a line?Use ^u (control + u) to erase the line. ^w (control + w) will erase a word. I accidentally ignored somebody! I didn't mean to do that :('i'gnore the same user again to remove from the ignore list. Why isn't anybody talking?That's life. Harden up.
How do I use backspace in com?Try **-** in command mode in com to toggle behavior. Or, use stty or 'bksp' to set the backspace correctly.How can I be in com multiple times?The basic rule is to be on a different server when entering com. Some common ways of doing this is to use screen, run ssh twice, etc.How do I send private messages?Use the **s** command in command mode: **s**user@host. Please note the @host portion; this is a required element of the command. If the user is in another room, add an optional host parameter to send the message: **s**user@host room.How do I see what happened in the past?Use the **r** key to review. Use **R** followed by a number to control how many lines of history to review. The **p** key can be used to see the history of another room: **p**roomname. The **p** command can also take an optional number of lines to display: **p**roomname number.How do I see who is in another room?Use **W** (upper case w) to see who is in another room.I see "<wliao@iceland DUMPs in 22 characters of 2 words in 3 lines>". What does that mean?Use the **r** or **R** command.I see "<wliao appears>". How do I do that?Use the **e**mote command in command mode. Use **e** followed by the action at the prompt: ":emote> tests this out". Why do I have to keep pressing the spacebar to talk?Other keys can be used to enter input mode. Try the **h** to see what keys are not being used such as the enter key.How do I erase a line?Use ^u (control + u) to erase the line. ^w (control + w) will erase a word. I accidentally ignored somebody! I didn't mean to do that :('i'gnore the same user again to remove from the ignore list. Why isn't anybody talking?That's life. Harden up.
===== COM Commands =====

View File

@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Best way to learn about the //DIALUP// SDF membership is to login to your SDF sh
membership is open to all validated members, no setup fee, a
monthly average of 15 hours a day, no dialer, no adverts! Enjoy!
The SDF&gt;DIALUP FAQ and [[http://dialup.tenex.org/|dialup.tenex.org]] have additional information. Before you sign-up though you may want to run **getdialup** first to see what numbers are in your local/extended [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_telephone_service| calling area]]. Usually this information is contained in your local telephone directory.
The SDF>DIALUP FAQ and [[http://dialup.tenex.org/|dialup.tenex.org]] have additional information. Before you sign-up though you may want to run **getdialup** first to see what numbers are in your local/extended [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_telephone_service| calling area]]. Usually this information is contained in your local telephone directory.
example: list all (503) access numbers in the Portland, OR area

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@ -8,13 +8,13 @@ There are several ways to setup a PPP-based dial-up network connection on Linux.
===== Prerequisites: =====
Verify that the modem is installed correctly and that **pppconfig**, **pon**, **poff** and **plog** are present on your system (all should be part of the base Ubuntu install). The **which** command is useful for this: ie. "which pppconfig" should return "/usr/sbin/pppconfig". Also have your SDF Dial-up account information at hand: username, password, local access number. See [[http://sdf.org/?faq?DIALUP|FAQ&gt;DIALUP]] for details.
Verify that the modem is installed correctly and that **pppconfig**, **pon**, **poff** and **plog** are present on your system (all should be part of the base Ubuntu install). The **which** command is useful for this: ie. "which pppconfig" should return "/usr/sbin/pppconfig". Also have your SDF Dial-up account information at hand: username, password, local access number. See [[http://sdf.org/?faq?DIALUP|FAQ>DIALUP]] for details.
A word about modems: most internal modems are "WinModems" (MS Windows only) and will not likely work with Linux; the best option is an external "hardware modem" that connects via a serial or USB port. Such modems contain their own controller chip (hence the term "hardware modem") and do not rely on special drivers to function. That said, if all you have is a WinModem it is possible that someone has created a Linux driver for it; check at [[http://linmodems.org/| linmodems.org]] to see if yours is supported.
===== Basic Setup: =====
Open a terminal window (click Applications&gt;Terminal ; maximize window) and invoke **pppconfig** using the **sudo** command:
Open a terminal window (click Applications>Terminal ; maximize window) and invoke **pppconfig** using the **sudo** command:
# mr_retro@rustbucket:~$ sudo pppconfig
[sudo] password for mr_retro:
@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ You should hear the modem initiating the handshake. If all goes well you should
Jan 12 15:16:42 rustbucket pppd[2039]: Serial connection established.
Jan 12 15:16:42 rustbucket pppd[2039]: using channel 6
Jan 12 15:16:42 rustbucket pppd[2039]: Using interface ppp0
Jan 12 15:16:42 rustbucket pppd[2039]: Connect: ppp0 &lt;--&gt; /dev/ttyS1
Jan 12 15:16:42 rustbucket pppd[2039]: Connect: ppp0 <--> /dev/ttyS1
...
==== Stopping: ====

View File

@ -8,11 +8,11 @@ Although many modems, especially internal WinModems, come with configuration sof
===== Prerequisites: =====
Verify that the modem is installed correctly and that any required modem driver(s) are also installed. If needed, click on //Settings&gt;Control Panel&gt;System// , then select //Hardware&gt;Device Manager// and locate //Modems&gt;your_modem//. Click //Action&gt;Properties//; your modem's multi-tab Properties window will appear. If all is well the Device Status (under the General tab) box will read "This device is working properly". If it is not, consult your modem documentation to understand why. You may need to tweak your modem's settings using other tabs on the Modem Properties window.
Verify that the modem is installed correctly and that any required modem driver(s) are also installed. If needed, click on //Settings>Control Panel>System// , then select //Hardware>Device Manager// and locate //Modems>your_modem//. Click //Action>Properties//; your modem's multi-tab Properties window will appear. If all is well the Device Status (under the General tab) box will read "This device is working properly". If it is not, consult your modem documentation to understand why. You may need to tweak your modem's settings using other tabs on the Modem Properties window.
===== Basic Setup: =====
Click //Start&gt;Settings&gt;Control Panel&gt;Network Connections&gt;New Connection Wizard//. The "Welcome to the New Connection Wizard" window will appear. Click //Next//. The following illustrates the SDF Dial-up connection creation process for fictional SDF user //mr_retro// using a built-in Lucent WinModem on a computer running Windows XP:
Click //Start>Settings>Control Panel>Network Connections>New Connection Wizard//. The "Welcome to the New Connection Wizard" window will appear. Click //Next//. The following illustrates the SDF Dial-up connection creation process for fictional SDF user //mr_retro// using a built-in Lucent WinModem on a computer running Windows XP:
{{tutorials/images/dialup_winxp01.png}} {{tutorials/images/dialup_winxp02.png}}

View File

@ -56,12 +56,12 @@ The easiest method to install these files is by launching "nospam -e" as mention
# procmail spamfilter using whitelist (2006 Yargo Bonetti)
# :: use at your own risk and any way you want! ::
# whitelist: file containing one valid e-mail address per line
# (only generic xxx@yyy.zz form, without "Name.." &lt;*&gt; parts)
# (only generic xxx@yyy.zz form, without "Name.." <*> parts)
WHITELIST=$MAILDIR/.whitelist
# spamfilter
FROM=`formail -c -x 'From:'|sed -e 's/.*&lt;\(.*@[^&gt;]*\)&gt;.*/\1/'`
FROM=`formail -c -x 'From:'|sed -e 's/.*<\(.*@[^>]*\)>.*/\1/'`
:0 hb:
* ! ? grep -i -F -e "$FROM" $WHITELIST &gt;/dev/null
* ! ? grep -i -F -e "$FROM" $WHITELIST >/dev/null
$MAILDIR/quarantine
This will compare the address in the From: field of incoming messages to the ones saved in the file $MAILDIR/.whitelist (of course, name and location can be changed), and when an address is //not found// in this file, the message will be saved in the folder $MAILDIR/quarantine (which can be modified as well) and not show up in the normal Inbox (and not be processed further). Now and then, one can look through the quarantine folder for "good messages", and add the corresponding addresses to the .whitelist file.
@ -172,8 +172,8 @@ Configure MUA to use //"127.0.0.1"// (localhost), port //2525// for out-going me
> **ex:**\\ Configure and test the //Heirloom Mailx// MUA for user //"frog"// on localhost //"mud.bog"//\\ to use //"localhost:2525"// for SMTP (off-site email):
# **//$HOME/.nailrc//**"
set smtp="localhost:2525"
set from="You &lt;someone@sdf.org&gt;"
set replyto="You &lt;someone@sdf.org&gt;" "
set from="You <someone@sdf.org>"
set replyto="You <someone@sdf.org>" "
% **hmail -v someone@sdf.org**
Subject: tunneled SMTP test
test 123
@ -181,17 +181,17 @@ test 123
Resolving host localhost . . . done.
Connecting to 127.0.0.1:2525 . . . connected.
220 sdf.lonestar.org ESMTP Sendmail 8.14.5/8.14.3; Tue, 13 Dec 2011 08:21:22 GMT
&gt;&gt;&gt; HELO mud.bog
>>> HELO mud.bog
250 sdf.lonestar.org Hello IDENT:root@otaku.sdf.org [192.94.73.6], pleased to meet you
&gt;&gt;&gt; MAIL FROM:
>>> MAIL FROM:
250 2.1.0 ... Sender ok
&gt;&gt;&gt; RCPT TO:
>>> RCPT TO:
250 2.1.5 ... Recipient ok
&gt;&gt;&gt; DATA
>>> DATA
354 Enter mail, end with "." on a line by itself
&gt;&gt;&gt; .
>>> .
250 2.0.0 pBD8LM7d000515 Message accepted for delivery
&gt;&gt;&gt; QUIT
>>> QUIT
221 2.0.0 sdf.lonestar.org closing connection
==== Tunnel Teardown: ====
@ -224,9 +224,9 @@ while [ 1 ]; do
SSH_PID=`ps aux | sed -n -e /sed/d -e /ssh\ \-N/p | wc -m`
if [ $SSH_PID -eq 0 ]; then
ssh $SSH_ARGS $LIS_PORT:$TAG_HOST:$TAG_PORT $SSH_USER@$SSH_HOST \
-p$SSH_PORT &amp;&gt;/dev/null
-p$SSH_PORT &amp;>/dev/null
DATE_TIME=`date '+%y.%m.%d %T'`
echo "$DATE_TIME SSH Tunnel restarted."&gt;&gt;$LOG_FILE
echo "$DATE_TIME SSH Tunnel restarted.">>$LOG_FILE
fi
sleep $SLEEP
done

View File

@ -1 +1 @@
**E-mail Beginners at a UNIX prompt**\\ \\ If you are new to UNIX you might like this tutorial to help you start sending and receiving E-mail at SDF. You should be a verified member before you can start using E-mail at SDF. \\ \\ Assuming you have already logged into and started using SDF a little, you should be comfortable with the command line by now. All you need to start sending and receiving E-mail is your E-mail Address and an E-mail Client. \\ \\ By default your E-mail Address is your SDF username, and you can choose the domain you would like to use from the list of SDF domain names. \\ \\ So if your username is "coffee" you can try sending yourself a mail with your existing E-mail account to: \\ \\ coffee@freeshell.org \\ \\ If you do not have an existing E-mail account you may wish to have another SDF member send you a test mail, sometimes E-mail boxes do not work properly until a test mail has been sent. \\ \\ Now log into SDF and type the command "alpine". This will open up a terminal based E-mail client where you can send and receive mail. All of the commands to operate alpine are listed on the bottom of the terminal, and generally speaking you just have to tap a key to operate. \\ \\ It is pretty self explanatory. \\ \\ The first time you open alpine you might have to answer a few questions, but generally if you just tap enter a couple times after opening alpine you will be in your E-mail inbox. At that point you can use the up and down arrow keys to navigate through emails and press enter on the one you would like to read. After reading the mail you can reply by tapping 'r'. To send the mail you will have to hold down the Ctrl key and tap 'x'. \\ \\ All controls which require holding down the Ctrl key and tapping another key will be signified with the '^' symbol in the command list. So if you see **^R** that means you should hold down Ctrl and tap 'r' to do that command. \\ \\ To return to the message index (your inbox) you will see the command list states '&lt;'. Thus you simply type a '&lt;' by holding down the shift key and tapping the '&lt;' key. \\ \\ There are many other methods of sending and receiving mail at SDF, and they are all quite easy to learn and self explanatory. You can experiment with 'mutt' (another terminal based mail client) by typing the command 'mutt' at the terminal, and you can read further E-mail tutorials for setting up visual mail clients on your local computer. \\ \\ Continue to [[http://sdf.org?tutorials/e-mail-basics|E-Mail Basics]]\\ \\ You can also view the [[http://sdf.lonestar.org/index.cgi?faq?EMAIL|E-mail FAQ]].
**E-mail Beginners at a UNIX prompt**\\ \\ If you are new to UNIX you might like this tutorial to help you start sending and receiving E-mail at SDF. You should be a verified member before you can start using E-mail at SDF. \\ \\ Assuming you have already logged into and started using SDF a little, you should be comfortable with the command line by now. All you need to start sending and receiving E-mail is your E-mail Address and an E-mail Client. \\ \\ By default your E-mail Address is your SDF username, and you can choose the domain you would like to use from the list of SDF domain names. \\ \\ So if your username is "coffee" you can try sending yourself a mail with your existing E-mail account to: \\ \\ coffee@freeshell.org \\ \\ If you do not have an existing E-mail account you may wish to have another SDF member send you a test mail, sometimes E-mail boxes do not work properly until a test mail has been sent. \\ \\ Now log into SDF and type the command "alpine". This will open up a terminal based E-mail client where you can send and receive mail. All of the commands to operate alpine are listed on the bottom of the terminal, and generally speaking you just have to tap a key to operate. \\ \\ It is pretty self explanatory. \\ \\ The first time you open alpine you might have to answer a few questions, but generally if you just tap enter a couple times after opening alpine you will be in your E-mail inbox. At that point you can use the up and down arrow keys to navigate through emails and press enter on the one you would like to read. After reading the mail you can reply by tapping 'r'. To send the mail you will have to hold down the Ctrl key and tap 'x'. \\ \\ All controls which require holding down the Ctrl key and tapping another key will be signified with the '^' symbol in the command list. So if you see **^R** that means you should hold down Ctrl and tap 'r' to do that command. \\ \\ To return to the message index (your inbox) you will see the command list states '<'. Thus you simply type a '<' by holding down the shift key and tapping the '<' key. \\ \\ There are many other methods of sending and receiving mail at SDF, and they are all quite easy to learn and self explanatory. You can experiment with 'mutt' (another terminal based mail client) by typing the command 'mutt' at the terminal, and you can read further E-mail tutorials for setting up visual mail clients on your local computer. \\ \\ Continue to [[http://sdf.org?tutorials/e-mail-basics|E-Mail Basics]]\\ \\ You can also view the [[http://sdf.lonestar.org/index.cgi?faq?EMAIL|E-mail FAQ]].

View File

@ -32,20 +32,20 @@ By default ECL starts up in interactive mode. Log into SDF host //miku// and typ
under certain conditions; see file 'Copyright' for details.
Type :h for Help.
Top level.
&gt;
>
The default ECL prompt is "&gt;". Enter Common-Lisp commands in the usual way:
The default ECL prompt is ">". Enter Common-Lisp commands in the usual way:
&gt; (+ 1 2 3)
> (+ 1 2 3)
6
&gt; (* 4 5)
> (* 4 5)
20
&gt; (format t "hello SDF~&amp;")
> (format t "hello SDF~&amp;")
hello SDF
NIL
&gt;
>
In-line help is available ; type :h for options. The debugger can be entered using "(break)" ; once entered typed :h to see options. To exit the ECL interactive session type ":exit" .
@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ To use ECL as a script executor (ie. CGI) the //-shell// and/or //-eval// option
ex: hello.lsp
% echo '(format t "~&amp;Hello SDF~&amp;")' &gt; hello.lsp
% echo '(format t "~&amp;Hello SDF~&amp;")' > hello.lsp
% ecl -norc -script hello.lsp
Hello SDF
@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ The following outlines the process, using the //ecl-readline// module (adds GNU
(asdf:operate 'asdf:load-op 'ecl-readline)
(ecl-readline::enable)
The next time you startup ECL it will compile the ecl-readline module and launch an interactive session. With ecl-readline enabled the default ECL prompt is "//CL-USER[n]&gt;//" and you should then be able to use Emacs-style command editing and history recall. If you don't like the provided prompt you can change it by editing the //ecl-readline.lisp// file.
The next time you startup ECL it will compile the ecl-readline module and launch an interactive session. With ecl-readline enabled the default ECL prompt is "//CL-USER[n]>//" and you should then be able to use Emacs-style command editing and history recall. If you don't like the provided prompt you can change it by editing the //ecl-readline.lisp// file.
===== Customizations =====

View File

@ -23,8 +23,8 @@
| C-x u | Undo (alias for C-/) |
| C-g | Abort the current command |
| C-l | Redraw and center screen at cursor |
| M-&lt; | Go to start of buffer |
| M-&gt; | Go to end of buffer |
| M-< | Go to start of buffer |
| M-> | Go to end of buffer |
| C-d | Delete next character |
| M-d | Delete next word |
| M-| | Execute shell command on region |
@ -132,8 +132,8 @@
| \ | Display the html source of the current page. |
| SPC | Scroll up the current window, or go to the next page. |
| b | Scroll down the current window, or go to the previous page. |
| &gt; | Scroll to the left. |
| &lt; | Scroll to the right. |
| > | Scroll to the left. |
| < | Scroll to the right. |
| . | Shift to the left. |
| , | Shift to the right. |
| M-l | Recenter horizontally. |

View File

@ -31,8 +31,8 @@ Emacs is a non-modal editor, meaning when you have a file loaded into a buffer,
| C-x u | Undo (alias for C-/) |
| C-g | Abort the current command |
| C-l | Redraw and center screen at cursor |
| M-&lt; | Go to start of buffer |
| M-&gt; | Go to end of buffer |
| M-< | Go to start of buffer |
| M-> | Go to end of buffer |
| Backspace | Delete previous character |
===== Getting Help =====
@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ Here are the commands we discussed above, and a few other useful ones:
Emacs has a nice search mode called //incremental search//. To use it, type "C-s". The text "I-search:" will appear in the echo area. Now start typing a search string. As you type, Emacs will search for your string in real-time (starting at point), highlighting any matches it finds. You can backspace and re-type text, and the search will continue to change with the text you type. When you find a match, you can hit "C-s" to search again and jump to the next match, or you can just hit "Enter" to exit the search mode and leave the cursor at the last match. "C-g" will abort the search and put your cursor back where you started. Searches will re-start at the top of a buffer if they hit the bottom. You can search backwards in a similar fashion with "C-r".
To replace text that matches a search pattern, type "M-%". You'll see "Query replace:" in the echo area. Type a search string, and hit "Enter". The echo area will now display "Query replace &lt;search string&gt; with:". Type the replacement string, and hit "Enter" again. Emacs will search through your buffer, looking for the search string. When it finds it, it will display "Query replacing &lt;search string&gt; with &lt;replacement string&gt;: (? for help)". Type "y" to replace this match and move onto the next, or "n" to skip this match. Type "!" to replace this occurrence of the search string and all other occurrences in your buffer without prompting. As usual, you can type "C-g" to abort a search/replace operation.
To replace text that matches a search pattern, type "M-%". You'll see "Query replace:" in the echo area. Type a search string, and hit "Enter". The echo area will now display "Query replace <search string> with:". Type the replacement string, and hit "Enter" again. Emacs will search through your buffer, looking for the search string. When it finds it, it will display "Query replacing <search string> with <replacement string>: (? for help)". Type "y" to replace this match and move onto the next, or "n" to skip this match. Type "!" to replace this occurrence of the search string and all other occurrences in your buffer without prompting. As usual, you can type "C-g" to abort a search/replace operation.
All searches in Emacs are case-insensitive by default, unless you type at least one capital letter in your search string - in that case, the search becomes case-sensitive.
@ -229,8 +229,8 @@ Then restart emacs, or place the cursor at the end of each line in turn and pres
| \ | Display the html source of the current page. |
| SPC | Scroll up the current window, or go to the next page. |
| b | Scroll down the current window, or go to the previous page. |
| &gt; | Scroll to the left. |
| &lt; | Scroll to the right. |
| > | Scroll to the left. |
| < | Scroll to the right. |
| . | Shift to the left. |
| , | Shift to the right. |
| M-l | Recenter horizontally. |

View File

@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ The first time we run this command we will be asked for some configuration detai
enter "x" for expert configuration mode,
enter "p" for pre-configured paranoia mode,
anything else, or an empty line will select standard mode.
?&gt;
?>
Choosing the standard mode should be good enough for most cases but if you would like extra security, choose **p** for the paranoia mode (be aware that paranoia mode can make more difficult to make backups of the data. See Section [[#tips_and_tricks|Tips and Tricks]] for further details). After this, we will be prompted to enter a password twice, to confirm it and reduce the chances of a typo.

View File

@ -2,8 +2,8 @@
\\
&lt;head&gt;
&lt;style type="text/css"&gt;
<head>
<style type="text/css">
.title{
background-color:#ffffff;
font-size:30px;
@ -92,65 +92,65 @@
-moz-border-radius: ;
padding: 5;
}
&lt;/style&gt;
&lt;/head&gt;
</style>
</head>
&lt;h1 class="title"&gt;Here is a test for the title format.&lt;/h1&gt;
<h1 class="title">Here is a test for the title format.</h1>
&lt;h3 class="header"&gt;Here is a test for the header format.&lt;/h3&gt;
<h3 class="header">Here is a test for the header format.</h3>
&lt;p class="body"&gt;Here is a test for the tutorial body format.&lt;/p&gt;
<p class="body">Here is a test for the tutorial body format.</p>
&lt;p class="note"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for a note/warning/tip.&lt;/p&gt;
<p class="note"><br>Here is a test for a note/warning/tip.</p>
&lt;p class="code"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for the code format.&lt;/p&gt;
<p class="code"><br>Here is a test for the code format.</p>
&lt;p class="reference"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for the reference format.&lt;/p&gt;
<p class="reference"><br>Here is a test for the reference format.</p>
&lt;table class="table"&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;&lt;th&gt; &lt;/th&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 1&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 2&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 3&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 4&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 5&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;/table&gt;
<table class="table">
<tr><th> </th>
<th>Table Header 1</th>
<th>Table Header 2</th>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Table Header 3</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Table Header 4</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Table Header 5</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
</table>
&lt;dl&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 1&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.3&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 2&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 2.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 3&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 3.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 3.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 4&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 4.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 4.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;/dl&gt;
<dl>
<dt>Section 1</dt>
<dd>Section 1.1</dd>
<dd>Section 1.2</dd>
<dd>Section 1.3</dd>
<dt>Section 2</dt>
<dd>Section 2.1</dd>
<dt>Section 3</dt>
<dd>Section 3.1</dd>
<dd>Section 3.2</dd>
<dt>Section 4</dt>
<dd>Section 4.1</dd>
<dd>Section 4.2</dd>
</dl>
&lt;a class="link" href="http://www.example.com"&gt;Example link&lt;/a&gt;
<a class="link" href="http://www.example.com">Example link</a>
&lt;br&gt;
&lt;img src="http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/example.png" alt="Example" height="128" width="128"/&gt;&lt;br&gt;
<br>
<img src="http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/example.png" alt="Example" height="128" width="128"/><br>
&lt;br&gt;
&lt;pre class="reference"&gt;
<br>
<pre class="reference">
Book:
Author's last name, first initial. (Publication date). Book title. Additional information. City of publication: Publishing company.
@ -165,6 +165,6 @@
Online document:
Author's name. (Date of publication). Title of work. Retrieved month day, year, from full URL
&lt;/pre&gt;
</pre>
$Id$

View File

@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ To prevent access by everybody, see the FAQ entry about [[http://sdf.org/index.c
For transferring small amount of text data (scripts, tables, source code snippets), think about copy/paste directly in the terminal! If you are [[http://sdf.org/index.cgi?faq?MEMBERS?01|MetaARPA]], then you can use "screen" and its built-in copy facility to transfer data between different screens.
To append text input in the terminal to a file on SDF, you can open the file on SDF in your favourite [[http://sdf.org/index.cgi?faq?BASICS?09|text editor]]. Or simply use the command "cat &gt;&gt;//file//", send the data to the terminal (via the paste function), and finish with a single line containing only ^D (CTRL-D) - to do that in the terminal, hit RETURN, CTRL-D, RETURN; this will close the standard input the "cat" was reading from.
To append text input in the terminal to a file on SDF, you can open the file on SDF in your favourite [[http://sdf.org/index.cgi?faq?BASICS?09|text editor]]. Or simply use the command "cat >>//file//", send the data to the terminal (via the paste function), and finish with a single line containing only ^D (CTRL-D) - to do that in the terminal, hit RETURN, CTRL-D, RETURN; this will close the standard input the "cat" was reading from.
===== E-mail - for small files only =====

View File

@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ command being the name of the command you want to learn about. As you can see, m
The user must have write permission in the parent directory.
EXIT STATUS
mkdir exits 0 if successful, and &gt;0 if an error occurred.
mkdir exits 0 if successful, and >0 if an error occurred.
SEE ALSO
chmod(1), rmdir(1), mkdir(2), umask(2)

View File

@ -49,9 +49,9 @@ Check the file in and unlock it so everyone can edit it.
Whether after issuing the co command or simply editing a file within /sys/html/tutorials, \\ modifications can be viewed in real time with a browser over the internet. But remember, \\ changes will only be saved if you use co/ci properly! The tutorial server script generates \\ the page header and footer, so you only need to supply the content of the tutorial you plan to \\ post and the RCS $Id$ tag. You can use the following as a template:\\
\\
&lt;html&gt;
&lt;head&gt;
&lt;style type="text/css"&gt;
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
.title{
background-color:#ffffff;
font-size:30px;
@ -140,93 +140,93 @@ Whether after issuing the co command or simply editing a file within /sys/html/t
-moz-border-radius: ;
padding: 5;
}
&lt;/style&gt;
&lt;/head&gt;
&lt;body&gt;
</style>
</head>
<body>
YOUR CODE HERE\\
&lt;br/&gt;\\
&lt;cite&gt;$Id$&lt;/cite&gt;\\
&lt;/body&gt;&lt;/html&gt;
<br/>\\
<cite>$Id$</cite>\\
</body></html>
\\
This is how to to define a comment\\
\\ &lt;!-- This is a comment --&gt;
\\ <!-- This is a comment -->
This is the code to define a tutorial title\\
\\ \\ &lt;h1 class="title"&gt;Here is a test for the title format.&lt;/h1&gt;
\\ \\ <h1 class="title">Here is a test for the title format.</h1>
This is the code to define a tutorial header\\
\\ \\ &lt;h3 class="header"&gt;Here is a test for the header format.&lt;/h3&gt;
\\ \\ <h3 class="header">Here is a test for the header format.</h3>
This is the code to define a tutorial body.\\
\\ \\ &lt;p class="body"&gt;Here is a test for the tutorial body format.&lt;/p&gt;
\\ \\ <p class="body">Here is a test for the tutorial body format.</p>
This is the code to define a tutorial note section.\\
\\ \\ &lt;p class="note"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for a note/warning/tip.&lt;/p&gt;
\\ \\ <p class="note"><br>Here is a test for a note/warning/tip.</p>
This is the code to define a tutorial code section.\\
\\ \\ &lt;p class="code"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for the code format.&lt;/p&gt;
\\ \\ <p class="code"><br>Here is a test for the code format.</p>
This is the code to define a tutorial reference section.\\
\\ \\ &lt;p class="reference"&gt;&lt;br&gt;Here is a test for the reference format.&lt;/p&gt;
\\ \\ <p class="reference"><br>Here is a test for the reference format.</p>
This is the code to define a table.\\
\\
&lt;table class="table"&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 0&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 1&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table Header 2&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;&lt;!-- This is column 1 --&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table DATA&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;&lt;!-- This is column 2 --&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table DATA&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;tr&gt;&lt;!-- This is column 3 --&gt;
&lt;th&gt;Table DATA&lt;/th&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;td&gt;TABLE DATA&lt;/td&gt;
&lt;/tr&gt;
&lt;/table&gt;
<table class="table">
<tr>
<th>Table Header 0</th>
<th>Table Header 1</th>
<th>Table Header 2</th>
</tr>
<tr><!-- This is column 1 -->
<th>Table DATA</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
<tr><!-- This is column 2 -->
<th>Table DATA</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
<tr><!-- This is column 3 -->
<th>Table DATA</th>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
<td>TABLE DATA</td>
</tr>
</table>
This is the code to define a list. You have have two levels: the title of a section(dt) and the subsection(dd).
\\
&lt;dl&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 1&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 1.3&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 2&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 2.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 3&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 3.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 3.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dt&gt;Section 4&lt;/dt&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 4.1&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;dd&gt;Section 4.2&lt;/dd&gt;
&lt;/dl&gt;
<dl>
<dt>Section 1</dt>
<dd>Section 1.1</dd>
<dd>Section 1.2</dd>
<dd>Section 1.3</dd>
<dt>Section 2</dt>
<dd>Section 2.1</dd>
<dt>Section 3</dt>
<dd>Section 3.1</dd>
<dd>Section 3.2</dd>
<dt>Section 4</dt>
<dd>Section 4.1</dd>
<dd>Section 4.2</dd>
</dl>
This is the code to define a link.
\\
&lt;a class="link" href="http://www.example.com"&gt;Example link&lt;/a&gt;
<a class="link" href="http://www.example.com">Example link</a>
\\
@ -234,11 +234,11 @@ This is the code to define a link.
No hotlinking of files from other sites: images must be uploaded to the /sys/html/tutorials/images folderWhen using images tags must be clearly defined.\\ Incorrect\\
\\ &lt;img src="tutorials/images/example.png"/&gt;\\
\\ <img src="tutorials/images/example.png"/>\\
Correct\\
\\ &lt;img src="http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/example.png" alt="Example" height="128" width="128"/&gt;\\
\\ <img src="http://sdf.org/tutorials/images/example.png" alt="Example" height="128" width="128"/>\\
\\

View File

@ -14,24 +14,24 @@ TWENEX represents the path not taken, or Unix as it might have been.
===== Reference Documents =====
SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]". SDF Public Access TWENEX. 19 July 2001. &lt;http://www.twenex.org/starter.html&gt; accessed 24 May 2010.
SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]". SDF Public Access TWENEX. 19 July 2001. <http://www.twenex.org/starter.html> accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://sdf.org/?tutorials/tops20-interactive|TOPS-20 Interactive Tutorial]]". SDF Public Access UNIX System. 23 May 2010. &lt;http://sdf.org/?tutorials/tops20-interactive&gt; accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://sdf.org/?tutorials/tops20-interactive|TOPS-20 Interactive Tutorial]]". SDF Public Access UNIX System. 23 May 2010. <http://sdf.org/?tutorials/tops20-interactive> accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://tilt.twenex.org/|TOPS-20 User's Guide]]". SDF Public Access TWENEX. June 1988. Digital Equipment Corporation. &lt;http://tilt.twenex.org/&gt; accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://tilt.twenex.org/|TOPS-20 User's Guide]]". SDF Public Access TWENEX. June 1988. Digital Equipment Corporation. <http://tilt.twenex.org/> accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://www.bourguet.org/v2/pdp10/cmds/|TOPS-20 Commands Reference Manual]]". Jean-Marc Bourguet's PDP-10 Page. July 1990. Digital Equipment Corporation. &lt;http://www.bourguet.org/v2/pdp10/cmds/&gt; accessed 24 May 2010.
"[[http://www.bourguet.org/v2/pdp10/cmds/|TOPS-20 Commands Reference Manual]]". Jean-Marc Bourguet's PDP-10 Page. July 1990. Digital Equipment Corporation. <http://www.bourguet.org/v2/pdp10/cmds/> accessed 24 May 2010.
===== File System Public Contents =====
TOPS20:&lt;BBOARD&gt;
TOPS20:<BBOARD>
36-BITS.TXT.1
MAIL.TXT.1
SAIL.TXT.1
Total of 33 pages in 3 files
TOPS20:&lt;C&gt;
TOPS20:<C>
ASSERT.H.3
C-ENV.H.20
CC.DOC.118
@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 307 pages in 41 files
TOPS20:&lt;C.SYS&gt;
TOPS20:<C.SYS>
FILE.H.15
IOCTL.H.8
IPCF.H.1
@ -95,12 +95,12 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 18 pages in 15 files
TOPS20:&lt;CHRIS&gt;
TOPS20:<CHRIS>
LOGIN.CMD.4
Total of 1 page in 1 file
TOPS20:&lt;DOCUMENTATION&gt;
TOPS20:<DOCUMENTATION>
5221BM.MEM.1
ACJ.MEM.1
ACTGEN.DOC.1
@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 4869 pages in 108 files
TOPS20:&lt;DOMAIN&gt;
TOPS20:<DOMAIN>
ASSIGNED.PORTS.1
.PROTOCOLS.1
GTDTST.EXE.3
@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 296 pages in 9 files
TOPS20:&lt;EMACS&gt;
TOPS20:<EMACS>
BASE.:EJ.1
.EMACS.2
ABSTR.:EJ.73
@ -718,7 +718,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 3434 pages in 491 files
TOPS20:&lt;FINGER&gt;
TOPS20:<FINGER>
-READ-THIS-.TXT.6
DBEDIT.EXE.1
.HLP.2
@ -740,12 +740,12 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 182 pages in 18 files
TOPS20:&lt;FISSION&gt;
TOPS20:<FISSION>
AUTO-LOAD.4TH.9
Total of 1 page in 1 file
TOPS20:&lt;GAMES&gt;
TOPS20:<GAMES>
ADVENT.EXE.2
ASCII.EXE.1
BKG.EXE.1
@ -801,7 +801,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 1931 pages in 52 files
TOPS20:&lt;HELP&gt;
TOPS20:<HELP>
ABOLISH-CATS.HLP.1
ACJLOG.HLP.1
ACTDMP.HLP.1
@ -918,7 +918,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 383 pages in 113 files
TOPS20:&lt;INFO&gt;
TOPS20:<INFO>
-READ-.-THIS-.1
ALL.TFO.1
AMBASSADOR.DOC.1
@ -1076,12 +1076,12 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 4060 pages in 154 files
TOPS20:&lt;JSOL&gt;
TOPS20:<JSOL>
FINGER.PLAN.1
Total of 1 page in 1 file
TOPS20:&lt;KCC&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC>
-FTP-.MIC.1
AGREE.TXT.10
CCX.EXE.602
@ -1091,14 +1091,14 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 184 pages in 6 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.FAIL&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.FAIL>
FAIL.EXE.4
.FAI.4
.MANUAL.2
Total of 244 pages in 3 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.INCLUDE&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.INCLUDE>
ASSERT.H.3
C-ENV.H.17
CC.DOC.118
@ -1142,7 +1142,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 302 pages in 40 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.INCLUDE.SYS&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.INCLUDE.SYS>
FILE.H.14
IOCTL.H.8
IPCF.H.1
@ -1161,7 +1161,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 18 pages in 15 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.KCC&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.KCC>
-READ-.-THIS-.1
C-ENV.H.12
CC.C.185
@ -1237,7 +1237,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 863 pages in 72 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.LIB&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.LIB>
-DIRS-.CMD.6
-MAKE-.CMD.22
-READ-.-THIS-.2
@ -1320,7 +1320,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 298 pages in 79 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.LIB.MATH&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.LIB.MATH>
-MAKE-.CMD.8
-READ-.-THIS-.4
ABS.C.5
@ -1387,14 +1387,14 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 73 pages in 63 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.LIB.NETWORK&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.LIB.NETWORK>
-MAKE-.CMD.2
GETHST.C.8
.REL.1
Total of 3 pages in 3 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.LIB.PML&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.LIB.PML>
-READ-.-ME-.1
CCTEST.C.1
COMPILE.MIC.6
@ -1436,7 +1436,7 @@ SMJ. "[[http://www.twenex.org/starter.html|TWENEX Starter Guide for UNIX Users]]
Total of 153 pages in 38 files
TOPS20:&lt;KCC.LIB.STDIO&gt;
TOPS20:<KCC.LIB.STDIO>
-MAKE-.CMD.20